` Fact-checking a fact-checker — imaginary family values

Last update on .

(I've got to blog about this before my distinguished homonym does...)

The letters section of the latest New Yorker includes the following “Editors’ Note” (the hyperlinks are my own):

The July 31, 2006, piece on Wikipedia, “Know It All,” by Stacy Schiff, contained an interview with a Wikipedia site administrator and contributor called Essjay, whose responsibilities included handling disagreements about the accuracy of the site’s articles and taking action against users who violate site policy. He was described in the piece as “a tenured professor of religion at a private university” with “a Ph.D. in theology and a degree in canon law.”

Essjay was recommended to Ms. Schiff as a source by a member of Wikipedia’s management team because of his respected position within the Wikipedia community. He was willing to describe his work as a Wikipedia administrator but would not identify himself other than by confirming the biographical details that appeared on his user page. At the time of publication, neither we nor Wikipedia knew Essjay’s real name. Essjay’s entire Wikipedia life was conducted with only a user name; anonymity is common for Wikipedia administrators and contributors, and he says that he feared personal retribution from those he had ruled against online. Essjay now says that his real name is Ryan Jordan, that he is twenty-four and holds no advanced degrees, and that he has never taught. He was recently hired by Wikia—a for-profit company affiliated with Wikipedia—as a “community manager”; he continues to hold his Wikipedia positions. He did not answer a message we sent to him; Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of Wikia and of Wikipedia, said of Essjay’s invented persona, “I regard it as a pseudonym and I don’t really have a problem with it.”

Updated to add: Apparently, according to some Wikipedians, it's OK to lie about your credentials on your user page because (a) it helps disguise your true identity from Bad People; (b) all Wikipedians are equal, regardless of how many formal degrees they have, so no harm is done by a Wikipedian who lies about how many formal degrees he has.

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  1. more helpful hints on 12/05/2014 2:04 p.m. #

    Fact-checking a fact-checker — imaginary family values

  2. liftreklama.ru on 12/07/2014 9:27 p.m. #

    Fact-checking a fact-checker — imaginary family values

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